Monthly Archives: November, 2020


Cuomo gets first major judicial rebuke for COVID-19 containment

Published - November 30, 2020

Nov. 30, 2020 – Before the Thanksgiving holiday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo had his knuckles wrapped by the U.S. Supreme Court for draconian limitations he imposed on the size of religious gatherings in communities with localized COVID-19 outbreaks. Rob Rosborough, author of the New York Appeals blog and a litigation partner with Whiteman, Osterman & Hanna, joined the show to explain the ruling from the country’s highest court.

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Government safety net mostly misses New York Landlords

Published - November 30, 2020

Nov. 30, 2020 – Since the arrival of the novel coronavirus, New York has taken extraordinary precautions to help keep renters in their homes. But what has been done to help the state’s landlords, how much trouble are they in as the pandemic stretches on and should New Yorkers care? We’re getting answers from Jaime Michelle Cain, a partner in Boylan Code’s real estate department and board member for the New York Capital Region Apartment Association.

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Heading to Albany: Second time’s the charm for Rochester Democrat

Published - November 30, 2020

Nov. 30, 2020 – As we continue to get to know the incoming class of freshman state lawmakers, we’ll hear from Jeremy Cooney, a Rochester Democrat who flipped a state senate seat long held by Republicans. We’ll talk about his unique origin story, addressing the state’s budget deficits and the potential for a bipartisan upstate caucus in the state Legislature. During the lightning round we ask Cooney about the upstate-downstate dividing line, whether Wegman’s is underrated and much more.

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S5-13: Women of Color, Performers – Part 5

Published - November 28, 2020

  “When I sing, I don’t want them to see that my face is black.  I don’t want them to see that my face is white.  I want them to see my soul.  And that is colorless.” – Marian Anderson Musicians of color still represent a small portion of orchestral musicians today.  But we are making headway, and the women on today’s program show that their talent is not defined by their heritage.  And when a youngster sees them performing on stage, sees someone who looks like themselves, they realize they can aspire to great performances as well.   Women

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New York’s courts look inward at record of systemic racism

Published - November 24, 2020

Nov. 24, 2020 – A report from the Office of Court Administration took a look at the racial and other biases in the state’s court system. We heard from Adrienne Holder, Attorney-in-Charge of the Legal Aid Society’s Civil Practice division, on the report and what moves the courts are taking.

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Good government group hopes to codify voting rights of parolees

Published - November 24, 2020

Nov. 24, 2020 – Legislation has been floating around the Capitol for years that would expand the right to vote to New Yorkers convicted of a felony after they are released from prison. Sean Morales-Doyle, Deputy Director of Voting Rights & Elections at the Brennan Center for Justice, explained how the system would work.

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‘Frivolous’ challenges to absentee ballots underscores need for reform

Published - November 23, 2020

Nov. 23, 2020 – Perry Grossman, a senior staff attorney in the Voting Rights Project at the New York Civil Liberties Union, explains how attorneys for campaigns get involved in the absentee ballot counting process in contested races. These attorneys slow down counting by the local boards of elections and often raise “frivolous” objections in an attempt to throw out votes they believe will benefit the opposing campaign.

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New York’s outdoors aids transition from solider to civilian

Published - November 23, 2020

Nov. 23, 2020 – This month, Governor Cuomo signed legislation aimed at expanding access for veterans to state parks and facilities. Aaron Leonard, Sierra Club Atlantic Chapter member who served in the U.S. Army, explained how this legislation will play a key role in the transition from solider to civilian.

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S5-12: Home and Hearth

Published - November 21, 2020

“I long, as does every human being, to be at home wherever I find myself.” – Maya Angelou   We are a mobile society, often find ourselves travelling across the country, across the world.  But the idea of “home” seems to be somehow rooted in each of us.  On this program, works from composers who were inspired by their homes, from the wilds of Australia, to the bustling downtown of Atlanta, GA.   Home and Hearth   Joan Tower:  Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman No. 4 Colorado Symphony Orchestra; Marin Alsop, conductor “Tower:  Fanfares for the Uncommon Woman” Koch International

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Government aid coming to an end for stressed food banks

Published - November 20, 2020

Nov. 20, 2020 – With the Thanksgiving holiday right around the corner, we got an update on the state’s food banks and the increased demand they are experiencing from Dan Egan, Executive Director of Feeding New York State.

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